138 years

The United States has come a long way in voting rights, but in 2018 we still have a long way to go to make every vote equal:

  • In the early U.S., most states allowed only adult white male property owners to vote. Women and men without property were largely prohibited from voting.
  • By 1856, white men were allowed to vote in all states regardless of property ownership, although requirements for paying tax remained in five states.
  • From 1880 onward, all of the states followed the state-based winner-take-all rule in presidential elections as a result of the rise of the political parties and their increasing self-interests. This is where 138 years of large-scale voting inequalities later the National Popular Vote comes in TODAY.
  • Surrounding 1880, a series of constitutional amendments established that voting rights cannot be denied or abridged based on the following:
    • 1870 and for men only "Race, color, or previous conditions of servitude."
    • 1920 "On account of sex."
    • 1964 "By reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax."
    • 1971 "Who are eighteen years of age or older."
  • Meanwhile, until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s Jim Crow laws requiring literacy tests, religious tests, and poll taxes were some of the state and local laws used in various parts of the United States to keep Native Americans, other non-white citizens, legal immigrants, newly naturalized citizens, and any other locally "undesirable" groups from exercising voting rights granted under the Constitution.
  • Yet none of the above improvements addressed the underlying winner-take-all disenfranchisement affecting the majority of Americans all along.  The winner-take-all state laws have been, and continue to be, the ultimate form of  American VOTER SUPPRESSION and one that is not solely aimed at American women (half the population) or economic, racial, or other types of minorities.

It's time for change, and New Mexico—the site of North America's oldest state capital (Santa Fe, founded in 1610)—

can play a key role in creating a just, egalitarian presidential election system for all Americans!


(Note: Maine and Nebraska changed their presidential elections to congressional district methods in 1969 and and 1992, respectively.)

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